28.10.2020

2019’s Most Catastrophic Crypto Caper

QuadrigaCX is one of the stories in crypto that’ll end up getting made into a movie. There are so many twists and turns, and mystery remains after the exchange’s CEO, Gerald Cotten, unexpectedly died (although some believe he faked his death) on a trip to India in late 2018. He was supposedly the only person who held the keys to some C$250 million (US$190 million) in user funds – a pile of money that has been in dispute ever since. But once Canadian authorities started their  investigation, it became clear Cotten also mismanaged client funds in many, many ways. 

QuadrigaCX: You know the story. Dead CEO, $190 million of customer’s funds missing, mismanagement, conspiracy. But where are we now in terms of making crypto clients whole? Magdalena Gronowska, who’s a member of the Official Committee of Affected Users and the Bankruptcy Board of Inspectors, says as much as the nondisclosure agreements (NDA) will allow.

In this episode, CoinDesk Managing Editor Zack Seward and business reporter Nikhilesh De speak with Magdalena Gronowska, who lost several thousand dollars when Canadian crypto exchange QuadrigaCX imploded. She’s now a member of the Official Committee of Affected Users and the Bankruptcy Board of Inspectors.

It’s been a little over a year since Cotten’s death was reported, setting off  a whirlwind investigation. Gronowska gives insight into where the case stands today.

Next up: Sign up to join the next CoinDesk Live on Tuesday, April 28 with Carlos Acevedo, founder of the Crypto Community Project, which is dedicated to educating low-income communities on crypto and blockchain.Acevedo is also the director of sales and the regional lead for Latin America at Brave.

How This ‘Legal Wrapper’ for DAOs Could Democratize Venture Capital

A limited liability autonomous organization (LAO) is the next chapter of capital formation, Aaron Wright and Priyanka Desai of OpenLaw explain.

It’s tough out there for a blockchain startup trying to raise money.

Not only has interest in crypto and blockchain projects tapered off over the past year or so of declining coin prices, but traditional venture capital has pivoted to focus on funding businesses that in some way overlap with the new normal of lockdowns, remote work and public health crises.

But the blockchain space has proved itself innovative as it relates to sussing out hidden capital. (Remember the ICO boom? Doesn’t that feel like a decade ago?)

In this episode, CoinDesk business editor Zack Seward speaks with Aaron Wright and Priyanka Desai of OpenLaw, a company that plans to launch a for-profit DAO next week. What does that even mean? Digging into the structure of this new limited liability autonomous organization, dubbed The LAO, is just one of the topics in this week’s episode.

Sign up to join the next CoinDesk Live on Thursday, April 23 at 4 p.m. eastern time, as we dig into the legal battle for QuadrigaCX users with Magdalena Gronowska, QuadrigaCX Bankruptcy Board of Inspectors and a Committee Member of the Official Committee of Affected Users, hosted by CoinDesk editors Zack Seward and Nikhilesh De.

Understanding Our Digital Personas Feat. Alex McDougall

Our digital personas are becoming the primary way we interact with the world, particularly during this worldwide pandemic. But we only see a tiny bit of the information being captured while we’re online, and we rarely know for what our personal data is being used. While most free services are basically powered by the sale of our personal data, there’s no interface to help us understand what we actually look like to data collectors and their customers.

In this kickoff episode, CoinDesk journalist Bailey Reutzel speaks with Alex McDougall of Bicameral Ventures about the data trails we leave behind when we surf the internet, and how users can take back some control of that data.

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